Creative Writing Ideas Gcse

Creative Writing Ideas Gcse-26
Writing: Proofreading Sp & L: Introduction to the speaking and listening task including: Content Assessment General criteria Reading: Research current affairs issues and identify one which means something to you Writing: Make a list of topics of interest Sp & L Share topics with the group Reading: Research two of the list of topics Writing: Make mind maps/ bullet points/lists, of the two chosen topics Sp & L: Discuss progress with teachers/support assistants.Reading: Choose one of the topics and research in more depth Writing: Start to create a first draft of the presentation Sp & L: share progress with the group Reading: Read over the presentation and evaluate and edit Writing: Amend if necessary Sp & L: Read the introduction to a member of staff and if confident the group.Here I refer to an article written by my colleague Caroline Saunders in issue 4.4 of Teach Secondary (Beyond the lines); just as she was encouraging art students to draw without using lines, we should encourage English students to do the same when developing ideas for story writing, in other words colouring their narrative from the inside out.

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There is a need to inject spontaneity and fun into developing ideas for writing and to encourage students to take risks.

Students need to begin to see writing as an art form, constructing narratives and piecing together ideas until they form rich literary narrative, not sticking to a predetermined layout.

In small groups students should draw out meanings and come up with a range of narrative possibilities.

You may want to support this by encouraging each student to come up with one ordinary, one daring and one ridiculous idea for each image, bringing in an element of risk early on.

Often in class there are a few students to whom this comes naturally; the majority pipe up with the phrase, ‘‘how do I start?

’’ whilst some just look scared at the prospect and begin planning their escape.

Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- writing to present a viewpoint.) Reading: Implicit information and ideas Writing: Form- articles Reading: Inference Writing: Form- letters and reports Reading: Point-evidence –explain Writing: Speeches Reading: Putting it into practice assessment- How the writer uses language to achieve particular effects in fiction texts) Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- writing to present a viewpoint) Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- how the writer uses language for effect in non-fiction texts) Writing: Ideas and planning: creative Reading: Word clauses Writing: Structure: creative Reading: Connotations Writing: Beginnings and endings Reading: Figurative language Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- planning creative writing) Reading: Creation of character Writing: Ideas and planning: Viewpoint 1 Reading: Creating atmosphere Writing: Ideas and planning: Viewpoint 2 Reading: Narrative voice ·Writing: Openings: Viewpoint Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- language in a fiction text.) Writing: Conclusions: viewpoint Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- language choices in a non-fiction text.) Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- presenting a viewpoint) Reading: Rhetorical devices 1 Writing: Paragraphing Reading: Rhetorical devices 2 Writing: Linking ideas. Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- paragraphing and adverbials ) Reading: whole text structure: non-fiction.

Writing: Formality and standard English 1 Reading: Identifying sentence types Writing: Formality and standard English 2 Reading: Commenting on sentences Writing: Vocabulary for effect: synonyms Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment-structure of a fiction text Writing: Vocabulary for effect: creative) Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment-comparing two non-fiction texts Writing: Vocabulary for effect: viewpoint Reading: Evaluating a fiction text 1 Writing: Language for different effects 1 Reading: Evaluating a fiction text 2 Writing: Language for different effects 2 Reading: Using evidence to evaluate Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- Evaluating a fiction text critically) Writing: : Putting it into practice (assessment- using language effectively in creative writing) Reading: Writing about two texts Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- using language effectively when writing to present a viewpoint) Reading: Selecting evidence for synthesis Writing: Sentence variety 2 Reading: Looking closely at language Writing: Sentences for different effects Reading: Planning to compare language Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- varying sentences for effect) Reading: Comparing language Writing: Ending a sentence Reading: Comparing structure Writing: Commas Reading: Comparing ideas Writing: Apostrophes and speech punctuation Reading: Comparing perspective Writing: Colons, semi-colons, dashes, brackets and ellipses Reading: Answering a comparison question Writing: Putting it into practice (assessment- using punctuation correctly) Reading: Putting it into practice (assessment- comparing the writer’s ideas and perspectives) Writing: Common spelling errors 1 Writing: Common spelling errors 2 Writing: Common spelling errors 3 Reading: Check that all activities have been completed.

Pick the idea that excites you the most, and you’ll find that its momentum will conjure up a whole new story world, replete with fascinating new characters! And if that’s not enough, generate your own with the Idea Engine, or peruse these lists of scene ideas, flash fiction prompts, and writing prompts.

Sometimes it’s very hard in English lessons to encourage students to be creative, especially when it comes to writing.

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